How to say you’re welcome in Italian

Italians know many ways to express gratitude and say thank you. Likewise, there are many ways to say you’re welcome in Italian. Learn them in this lesson.


How do you say you’re welcome in Italian?

Prego

Prego is a versatile little word. Italians use it as a way to say you’re welcome in Italian, but depending on the situation you may also use it to translate please. It is a very common word and is used in both formal and informal relationships.

Prego
You’re welcome

Now, where would you use prego as a translation for please? In courtesies.

  • You’re holding the door for someone
    Prego, dopo di lei. Please, after you.
  • You’re inviting someone to sit down
    Prego, si sieda pure. Please, have a seat.

Trivia
Prego has a double meaning in Italian. It can be used to translate you’re welcome in Italian, but it is also the translation of the English I pray, from the verb pregare which means, you guessed it, to pray.


Di nulla, di niente

Di nulla and di niente both translate to it was nothing, nulla and niente being translations for nothing.

They are common and neutral expressions, in that they can be used in both formal and informal situations, but di nulla is a bit more formal than the other.

Di nulla
It was nothing
Literally: Of nothing

Di niente
It was nothing
Literally: Of nothing

you are welcome in italian - di nulla
Di nulla
It was nothing

E di che?

E di che? is more informal than prego and di nulla. It could be translated to English as “what for?”.

E di che?
What [are you thankful] for?
Literally: And of what?


Non c’è di che

When you want to be polite, use non c’è di che. It is more formal than prego and you’ll make a good impression.

It is the contracted form of non c’è di che ringraziare, which literally means there is nothing to thank for. Since the sentence is missing a vital part, there is no literal translation to English.

(To make a good impression → Fare bella figura!)

Non c’è di che
Don’t mention it


Non c’è (nessun) problema

This is a neutral expression to say you’re welcome in Italian. It comes in two variants: non c’è problema and non c’è nessun problema, and translates to there is no problem.

Non c’è problema
No problem
Literally: There is no problem

Non c’è nessun problema
No problem
Literally: There is no problem

you are welcome in italian - no problem
Non c’è problema
No problem

Ci mancherebbe (altro)

Ci mancherebbe and ci mancherebbe altro are neutral you’re welcome expressions. They are not used as often as prego or di nulla, but you will still hear them often enough.

These expressions derive from the verb mancare, meaning to miss and don’t really don’t make sense when literally translated to English. We could translate them as my pleasure.

Ci mancherebbe
Don’t mention it, my pleasure
Literally: There would miss

Ci mancherebbe altro
Don’t mention it, my pleasure
Literally: There would miss something else


Figurati, si figuri

Figurati is used in informal situations only. Si figuri is used in formal contexts only.

They are based off of the verb figurarsi, to imagine oneself.

Figurati
Don’t mention it
Literally: Figure

Si figuri
Don’t mention it
Literally: Figure

These expressions aren’t only used to translate you’re welcome in Italian. When a friend thanks you for a gift, for example, replying with figurati is much more common than with prego.

Grazie del regalo! – Figurati!
Thanks for the gift! – Don’t mention it!

you are welcome in italian - figurati
Grazie del regalo! – Figurati!
Thanks for the gift! – Don’t mention it!

Figurati / si figuri are also used when you want to convey the message that you did something out of pleasure.

Grazie per avermi aiutato! – Figurati!
Thanks for helping me! – Don’t mention it!

Finally, you can also use them instead of thanks to politely refuse an offer.

Vuoi che ti accompagni fino a casa? – Ma no, figurati!
Do you want me to accompany you home? – No, don’t even mention it!


Per così poco

Per così poco literally translates to for so little and you use it when you want to convey the message that you did something out of kindness and it was only natural for you to do it.

Per così poco
Don’t mention it
Literally: For so little


What next?

You can do the you’re welcome in Italian interactive exercises!

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